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MANAGEMENT UPDATE.

APRIL 8 SOLAR ECLIPSE: AN ASTRONOMICAL BOON AND EXPENSE

On Monday, April 8, a total solar eclipse will be most acutely visible to about 31.6 million US residents. According to a March 27 article, published by the National League of Cities, only 21 total eclipses have passed over the “lower 48 states in US history.” (The next involving the US will be in 2044, so don’t hold your breath.)


In only a relatively narrow 115-mile path will the light from the sun be entirely blocked by the moon – a path that stretches diagonally from the southern Texas border (slightly southwest of San Antonio) to the northwestern tip of Maine and then into eastern parts of Canada. It will still be a great show, even if the sunlight isn’t entirely obliterated, to most people in the US and Canada.


Here are the large cities that will be lucky enough to witness the full impact of this historic astronomical event: San Antonio, Austin, Dallas, Little Rock, Indianapolis, Cleveland, Buffalo, and Montreal. 



In addition, these and other large, medium and small cities and towns in the 115-mile path will also benefit with additional revenues, as sightseers throng to enjoy the total experience. In fact, in 2017, when a total eclipse was fully visible in a much smaller area, it attracted 1.6 million visitors and $269 million to South Carolina, alone, according to the NLC.


Medina, Ohio (about 33 miles from Cleveland with a population of 26,023) is promoting the slogan “Sun or no sun, Medina is gonna have fun”. With 128,000 people expected, it is closing schools, courts and county buildings to control traffic. And “as an Ambassador for the Solar Eclipse by The Great Lakes Science Center,” it received “1,000 pairs of solar viewing glasses, a telescope with a solar filter, and other supplies for a watch party at the local Recreation Center,” according to the NLC article.


But under the category of “there’s no such thing as a free lunch,” in this case, places attracting many visitors for the eclipse also need a lot of preparation and planning for potential emergency services. For example, an executive order signed by Indiana Gov. Eric Holcomb on March 26 was titled “Preparation for the Total Solar Eclipse of 2024.” Envisioning the potential for “widespread and significant impact placed on Indiana’s emergency response, transportation, communication and other critical infrastructure systems,” it stated that “a statewide disaster emergency exists to ensure preparedness”.


Similarly, a March 13 executive order in Ohio, signed by Gov. Mike DeWine noted that the Ohio Emergency Management Agency was coordinating state, local and private partners “to prepare for increased demands on gas, food, shelter, traffic and cell phone service.” The order also requires “All state departments and agencies to be at the ready and prepared to utilize their personnel and resources as necessary to protect the lives, safety, health and property of the citizens of Ohio and all those traveling to or through the State during the period of April 5, 2024 through April 9, 2024.”


#StateandLocalManagement #StateEmergencyPlanning #CityEmergencyPlanning #TotalSolarEclipse #GovernorExecutiveOrder #StateTourism #CityTourism #IndianapolisSolarEclipsePlanning #ClevelandSolarEclipsePlanning #SanAntonioSolarEclipsePlanning #BuffaloSolarEclipsePlanning #MontrealSolarEclipsePlanning #AustinSolarEclipsePlanning #GovernorEricHolcombSolarEclipseExecutiveOrder #GovernorMikeDeWineSolarEclipseExecutiveOrder #SolarEclipse2024 #MedinaOhio #NationalLeagueOfCities #NLC


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