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MANAGEMENT UPDATE.

WHERE ARE HR OFFICIALS USING DATA THE MOST?

On January 28, the National Association of State Personnel Executives (NASPE) completed its mid-year meeting in Washington D.C. One highlight of the meeting was the release of the 2023 HR Architecture Survey, a treasure-trove of survey data from 34 states about their human resource systems. 


The report, which comes out every two years, covers a wide variety of topics, including HR structure, state unionization, retirement, health insurance, technology systems and service delivery. One interesting change from the 2021 version – the average state salary has risen from $57,270 then to $64,826 in 2023.



We’ll be writing about other aspects of these survey results over the next weeks, but wanted to zero in this week on one of particular interest to us – state human resource agencies’ data use.  Specifically, the survey asked, “To what extent does your central HRM agency use HR data to drive decision-making in the following areas?” Respondents were given five options for their responses:

“Do not know,” “Not at all,” “To a little extent,” “To some extent,” “To an extent,” and “To a great Extent.” To calculate the percentages listed below, we toted up positive responses that fell in the last three categories. 


The two areas that lead the list for the use of data: Recruiting, followed by retention. New Mexico and North Carolina stood out as states that have been using data to the greatest extent.

Here are the 2023 survey results:


Recruiting: 83%. Seven states answered, “to a great extent”, Connecticut, Delaware, Idaho, Indiana, New Jersey, New Mexico, and North Carolina.


Retention: 80%. Two states answered “to a great extent”: New Mexico and North Carolina.

Labor optimization: 69%. Three states answered “to a great extent”: Arkansas, California, and New Mexico.


Training & Development: 60%.  Three states answered “to a great extent”: Delaware, New Jersey, and New Mexico.


Workforce Planning: 59%. One state answered “to a great extent”: New Mexico.


Succession Planning: 50%. One state answered “to a great extent”: Indiana.


Safety: 27%.  One state answered “to a great extent”: North Carolina.


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MANAGEMENT UPDATE ARCHIVES.

ASPAS NEW H. GEORGE FREDERICKSON SOCIAL EQUITY CENTER

RETHINKING FINANCIAL REPORTING

NINE CITIES HONORED FOR FORGING A FUTURE WITH DATA

THE IBM CENTERS NEW ADVISORY COUNCIL

STATES MAY SAVE MONEY ON MEDICARE BUT AT WHAT COST

ENERGIZING INTERGENERATIONAL MOBILITY 

IF IT HAPPENS IN LOUISIANA KEEP IT IN LOUISIANA

PREDICTING STATE EXPENDITURES

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